Dog breeding

Australian dog breeding crisis: welfare expert warns of dangerous increase in ‘puppy breeding’

Dogs on commercial puppy farms are suffering in horrific conditions as their owners get richer, an animal welfare expert has warned.

RSPCA Queensland Chief Inspector Daniel Young made worrying assessment of dog breeding activity in Australia after 78 dogs were seized in “intensive breeding operation” outside Brisbane this week.

Inspectors for the charity found puppies suffering from worm infestations, physical injuries and untreated health issues while living in confined spaces.

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Lucrative puppy farms allow their owners to make a small fortune while the dogs in their care languish in horrific conditions, an animal welfare expert has warned (photo of emaciated dog found on a farm in puppies in Goondiwindi, Queensland)

The charity’s Queensland chief inspector, Daniel Young, told Daily Mail Australia that the digital age is transforming the way large farms make money.

“Social media has given them a better way to sell these animals,” he said.

“Some of these dogs are so desirable and it’s a business that business people want to do – people come from Western Australia or New South Wales (Queensland) to buy them.

“It’s no longer local. ”

In Tuesday’s raid, dogs and puppies were seized as part of Operation Rolling Thunder – and many of them are currently undergoing veterinary treatment.

Among the dogs seized was a Boston Terrier dog named Gracie, who suffered from anemia so severe that she had to undergo a blood transfusion.

The investigation into dog breeding activities in Australia comes after 78 dogs were seized from a

The investigation into dog breeding activity in Australia comes after 78 dogs were seized in an “intensive breeding operation” outside Brisbane this week (the ribs of a Boston Terrier called Gracie may have be seen during this raid)

RSPCA inspectors found puppies suffering from worm infestations, physical injuries and untreated medical conditions while living in confined quarters

RSPCA inspectors found puppies suffering from worm infestations, physical injuries and untreated medical conditions while living in confined quarters

In Tuesday's raid, dogs and puppies were seized as part of Operation Rolling Thunder - and many of them are currently undergoing veterinary treatment.

In Tuesday’s raid, dogs and puppies were seized as part of Operation Rolling Thunder – and many of them are currently undergoing veterinary treatment.

“It is obvious that these dogs live in poor conditions and have suffered for a long time,” said Anne Chester, chief veterinarian of the RSPCA.

“Significant concerns have been identified, including potentially harmful intestinal worm infestations, various behavioral issues that will require long-term rehabilitation, as well as physical injuries and scarring that must be treated or documented.

Mr Young’s involvement in the Lockyer Valley raid follows his pivotal role in exposing one of Australia’s worst cases of puppy mill neglect in 2017.

Shocking photos from a 2017 raid showed emaciated dogs chained to the property, while one even showed a rotting canine carcass lying on a mattress (pictured)

Shocking photos from a 2017 raid showed emaciated dogs chained to the property, while one even showed a rotting canine carcass lying on a mattress (pictured)

The charity's Queensland chief inspector Daniel Young told Daily Mail Australia the digital age is transforming the way large farms make money

The charity’s Queensland chief inspector Daniel Young told Daily Mail Australia the digital age is transforming the way large farms make money

Shocking photos showed emaciated dogs chained up on the property, while one even showed a rotting dog carcass lying on a mattress.

The owner of the farm was charged with 215 animal neglect charges, but died before being brought to justice.

Intensive dog breeding, often referred to as puppy mills, is not illegal in Australia provided the animals are cared for enough.

But in 2017, a law was passed by the Victorian Parliament, which meant that breeders in the state could only keep 50 fertile bitches at a time as of April 2020.

“Some of these dogs are so desirable and it’s a business that business people want to get in – people come from Western Australia or New South Wales (Queensland) to buy them,” Mr. Young (photo of a dachshund and its puppies found in the Lockyer Valley raid this week)


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